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An Uncertain Choice

$12.99
Format: Paperback

Availability: In stock

Quick Overview:

In this YA novel from bestselling author Jody Hedlund, Rosemarie has a month to choose between the cloister and marriage in order to fulfill a vow her parents made almost eighteen years ago. But as the men vying for her heart come under danger, Rosemarie finds the choice to be difficult. Especially when one of the knights captures her heart.
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Due to her parents’ promise at her birth, Lady Rosemarie has been prepared to become a nun on the day she turns eighteen. Then, shortly before her birthday, a friend of her father’s enters the kingdom and proclaims her parents’ will left a second choice—if Rosemarie can marry before the eve of her eighteenth year, she will be exempt from the ancient vow.

Before long, Rosemarie is presented with the three most handsome and brave knights in the land. But when the knights’ arrival results in a series of attacks within her land, she begins to wonder if the convent is the best place after all. If only one of the knights—the one who appears the most guilty—had not already captured her heart.

Contributor(s) Jody Hedlund
About the Contributor(s) Jody Hedlund

Jody Hedlund is a best-selling and award-winning author who loves fairy- tales and happily-ever-afters. She makes her home in Midland, MI with her husband and five children. When she's not writing another of her page-turning stories, you can usually find her sipping coffee, eating chocolate, and reading.

UPC 025986749194
ISBN-10 0310749190
ISBN-13 9780310749196
Publish Date Mar 3, 2015
Weight (lbs) 1.0000
Height 8.00
Width 5.25
Length 256
Length Unit Pages
Publisher Zondervan
Price $12.99
Format Paperback
Language English

Customer Reviews

Review by English Lady
Overall Rating
enjoyed this book at first, in spite of some reservations, but by the end there was just too much I didn’t like for it to merit a higher rating from me. Yes, it was a sweet story about growing up and finding true love, yes there were some well-drawn characters, and the core of the storyline was original
Yes, I think children might like it, and I appreciate that it is aimed at a Young Adult audience, and it supposed to have a fairytale like feel, but… there were many issues, some common to the Romance genre. Clichéd situations, predictable ending, etc, but I suppose that’s to be expected.

However, my main gripe was Lady Rosemarie- in some ways she was endearing- but way too perfect, and too headstrong. In truth, I think she may have been one of the most the most frustrating heroines ever. Her actions were frequently inconsistent, contradictory and her outlook often more like that of a modern liberal than a Medieval person.

Like how she was constantly saying she wanted to be a strong leader, uphold law and order and rule justly- but the one of the only time we see her dealing with crime she insists on letting thieves free because they were only trying to feed poor little orphan children.
Indeed, I actually found myself sympathizing with the nasty sheriff on occasion, as Rosemarie seemed to stop him from doing his job at every turn- not allowing him to arrest known miscreants for a serious crime, or continually thwarting his attempts to control contagious disease with her insistence upon entering infected areas to distribute yet more food to the poor.

Elsewhere, she would thank her fellows for giving her wise advice- then almost immediately go against it by entering areas believed to be infected with disease to distribute food- and by doing so recklessly risk infecting all the people at her castle. Or, continually, she would harp on about how the knights were so honourable they would never dream of doing anything inappropriate in public, and agreeing on her need for a chaperone--- yet almost every time she went out with one of the knights was unchaperoned, and they’d end up almost kissing or touching in public.
Yet after all this, she would complain about how she wanted her fellows to treat her like a responsible adult- when she didn’t seem capable of behaving like one half the time.

Even her charity to the poor seemed contrived. Yes, her wanting to feed the peasants and sick was all well and good- but it was all she seemed to be bothered about- chapter after chapter she was agonizing about the poor little peasants having enough to eat.
Seriously, it was as if the entire population of her lands utterly incapable of producing their own food or working to support themselves?
I agree with another reviewer who asserted that the poor folk seemed like nothing more than props to make Rosemarie look good…perhaps she’d have made a better aid worker or human rights activist then a ruler, as she didn’t seem to have a clue about the realities of estate management or government.

My main issue was the frequent mention of torture . We get the point very early on that good little Rosemarie disapproves of it, and had banned it in her lands (even though it is claimed that it was acceptable elsewhere), but throughout the story she continually goes on and on about it.
Although there was nothing too graphic, I really felt that there was far too much emphasis placed upon torture, and it was much overused-like every time drama was needed, there would be another torture scene or attempted murder--and the methods used were almost so extreme as to be rendered unbelievable.

Now I understand this was a work of fantasy set in a fictional country, but I still assert that the representation of torture as normal and widely accepted punishment for almost every crime (or even the suspicion of crime), which could just be summarily inflicted upon a person on the order of a noble was totally inaccurate and pointless.
In real history by the fourteenth century (when this story is set), torture was actually rare in England, and even banned under common law, except in cases of treason and heresy.

I can say thatI’ve never heard of anyone being boiled to death or racked for stealing- as almost happens early on in the story.
It’s almost as if, because the story was set in the Medieval period, it had to include torture, and other nastiness just to emphasize how horrible life was at this time, how horrible some of the characters were, and how good Rosemarie was in comparison.

Even leaving accuracy aside, it is perhaps a sad reflection on our society that references to torture, extreme brutality, hordes of unwashed peasants and streets flowing with excrement seem to be compulsory in stories set in the medieval period (and others). As though readers will regard an author’s work as ‘unrealistic’ if it does not depict Medieval Europe- or even a fictional Medieval society- as some orgy of violence, lawlessness, starvation, disease and misery populated by largely corrupt upper classes who can go around killing each other’s families and doing lots of other nasty things without penalty.
Its a shame, because this book certainly had a lot going for it otherwise, but the above really spoiled my enjoyment.

I received a free E-Galley of this book from the publisher via Netgalley for review, I was not required to write a positive one and all opinions expressed are my own. (Posted on 3/18/2017)
Review by Jalynn
Overall Rating
Lady Rosemarie knew the day would come for her to finally become the nun everyone prepared her for, the promise from her birth would finally be fulfilled. Her parents had died leaving an abbot, one she had grown to love and trust, to care for and guide her. But one evening, her father’s close friend arrives telling her of a second chose in the promise, if she can marry before the night of her eighteenth birthday, she will not have to fulfill the promise. With only a month to go, she is shown three handsome knights, two of which have money and land in abundance, they wish to please her with the finest treasures. The third does nothing of the sort, but instead ignores Lady Rosemarie.

As her birthday nears, things go wrong with two of the knights getting injured. And the third, convicted of something unbelievable. Everyone races to find out the truth before the eve of her birthday. But what happens if the truth is worse than one ever imagined?

An Uncertain Choice is a wonderful novel. I loved every second of this amazing read. This author has now become one of my favorites and I can’t wait till I can read more of her amazing stories.

**Disclosure** This book was sent to me free of charge for my honest review from the author. (Posted on 12/7/2015)
Review by BookwormMama14
Overall Rating
Lady Rosemarie finally has peace about her imminent future at the convent. But one month before her eighteenth birthday The Noblest Knight returns after his long absence and everything she knows is turned upside down. The Ancient Vow of Hannah, that Lady Rosemarie's parents made, has one exception: marriage of true love by midnight on the 18th birthday will end the vow. Three knights are presented to Lady Rosemarie who have a contest to win her heart. But is one month long enough to fall in love? When incidences arise, it appears one of the knights is to blame. Is the convent a better choice for Lady Rosemarie or will she follow her heart to her true love?

Jody Hedlund's first YA novel did not disappoint! The medieval setting, the romance, the intrigue and the faith all met with my expectations. Lady Rosemarie's character is very naive and is swayed easily by other people's opinions. However, as the story moves along, she learns how to stand up for herself and finds what she truly believes. Although the story line was fairly predictable, I was thoroughly entertained. As usual with Jody Hedlund's books, I couldn't put it down (the laundry still isn't done). I am thankful to Jody for providing appropriate YA reading material.

I strongly recommend that you read The Vow, prequel to An Uncertain Choice. (Posted on 7/4/2015)
Review by Fitzysmom
Overall Rating
Like most girls I enjoy a good fairy tale. I like the story of princesses and castles, knights in shining armor swooping in to save the day, and of course the happily-ever-after endings. I just can't resist being swept up in the romance of it all for a few hours.

I've been a fan of Jody Hedlund's historical fiction so when she released her first young adult historical fiction I just had to give it a try. It was everything that I had envisioned and more. The beautiful princess Rosemarie has lost her parents to the Plague but she is fortunate to have what she thinks is trustworthy mentors to guide her in ruling her lands.

By the time we enter the story Rosemarie has come to terms with devoting herself to living out the rest of her life at the convent. But this is a fairy-tale so we have to have some dashing knights to woo the beautiful princess. Not one but three of the bravest and handsomest knights in the land come to Montfort Castle with the intention of winning the hand of Rosemarie.

The story that proceeds is one of intrigue and romance. What appears to be the truth is a far cry from it. I enjoyed the journey through the unfolding story. I had inklings of what was happening out of eyesight but it didn't ruin the story at all, in fact it enhanced it.

I would highly recommend this wonderful book to teens and older. There is nothing untoward in it but it does have subject matter that would be better understood by someone in their teens rather than younger. Remember that this is set in the Medieval period so torture was a very accepted form of punishment. Some of that is described in the story. As an adult I found it to be a great read. It moves along quickly and the vocabulary is rich. If you liked the current version of Cinderella that is playing in theaters I think you will be drawn to this as well. I'm looking forward to the future books in this series.

I received a copy of this book to facilitate my review. (Posted on 4/21/2015)
Review by Fitzysmom
Overall Rating
Like most girls I enjoy a good fairy tale. I like the story of princesses and castles, knights in shining armor swooping in to save the day, and of course the happily-ever-after endings. I just can't resist being swept up in the romance of it all for a few hours.

I've been a fan of Jody Hedlund's historical fiction so when she released her first young adult historical fiction I just had to give it a try. It was everything that I had envisioned and more. The beautiful princess Rosemarie has lost her parents to the Plague but she is fortunate to have what she thinks is trustworthy mentors to guide her in ruling her lands.

By the time we enter the story Rosemarie has come to terms with devoting herself to living out the rest of her life at the convent. But this is a fairy-tale so we have to have some dashing knights to woo the beautiful princess. Not one but three of the bravest and handsomest knights in the land come to Montfort Castle with the intention of winning the hand of Rosemarie.

The story that proceeds is one of intrigue and romance. What appears to be the truth is a far cry from it. I enjoyed the journey through the unfolding story. I had inklings of what was happening out of eyesight but it didn't ruin the story at all, in fact it enhanced it.

I would highly recommend this wonderful book to teens and older. There is nothing untoward in it but it does have subject matter that would be better understood by someone in their teens rather than younger. Remember that this is set in the Medieval period so torture was a very accepted form of punishment. Some of that is described in the story. As an adult I found it to be a great read. It moves along quickly and the vocabulary is rich. If you liked the current version of Cinderella that is playing in theaters I think you will be drawn to this as well. I'm looking forward to the future books in this series.

I received a copy of this book to facilitate my review. (Posted on 4/21/2015)

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